Solar Updraft Towers Lesson 5: Learning About Solar Updraft Towers

Average Rating:
0
Author:
Lisa Morgan
Intended Grade Level(s):
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
Solar updraft towers
renewable energy innovations
passive solar energy usage
Estimated Activity Length:
0 sec
Learning Goal(s):
  1. Students will be able to define and explain what a solar updraft tower is.
  2. Students will make connections between their previous engineering challenge and a real world solution to the world’s growing energy demands, including careers.

This lesson helps students learn about solar updraft towers being planned and built around the world to help solve the energy crisis by using unlimited power from the sun. This will provide real world context to the engineering challenge they engaged in during the previous lesson. A video is shown to the class; then students are encouraged to... View full description >>

Solar Updraft Towers Lesson 4: Let's Build Our Wind and Solar Energy Toy

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0
Author:
Lisa Morgan
Intended Grade Level(s):
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
wind energy
engineering design
Solar Updraft Tower
solar energy
energy transformations
Estimated Activity Length:
3 hours
Learning Goal(s):
  1. Students will determine that thermal energy resulting from the sun’s radiation can create an updraft that will power a turbine to spin.                                                
  2. Students will identify characteristics of turbine design that improve the success of their device.
  3. Students will utilize content from previous phenomena they investigated, such as the chimney stack effect and Norwegian candle toys, to determine how to best harness the energy transformed by their device from the sun.

Students will combine what they learned in previous lessons using their investigations of convection-related phenomena to design a device that will convert light energy from the sun into thermal energy and utilize the resulting convection currents. Their primary objective will be to design a device that uses energy from the sun when placed on a... View full description >>

Solar Updraft Towers Lesson 3: Wind Power--A Hands on Experience

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0
Author:
Lisa Morgan
Intended Grade Level(s):
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
wind energy
engineering design
energy transformations
Estimated Activity Length:
2 hours
Learning Goal(s):
  1. Students will understand that wind energy can be converted into other forms of energy.
  2. Students will determine different methods to increase the effectiveness of a wind turbine blade at harnessing and converting the mechanical energy of the wind.

This lesson challenges students to work in teams to design successful turbine blades for the “KidWind Firefly”. The firefly has an LED light that lights up when the students have designed turbine blades that spin effectively. This lesson provides students with hands on experience in designing turbines blades. This will scaffold them nicely into... View full description >>

Solar Updraft Towers Lesson 2: Where Does Energy Go?

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0
Author:
Lisa Morgan
Intended Grade Level(s):
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
Convection currents
properties of matter
Energy Fundamentals
energy transformations
Estimated Activity Length:
5 hours
Learning Goal(s):
  1. Students will understand that hot air rises
  2. Students will understand why hot water and hot air rise and cold air and cold water sink.
  3. Students will learn that wind is produced by warm air rising and cold air sinking.
  4. Students will learn that the energy of moving hot air can be converted into other forms of energy.
  5. Students will understand that energy from the sun can be converted into heat.
  6. Students will discuss the effects of the chimney stack phenomenon.

This lesson consists of six demonstration activities that show examples of ways in which water and air absorb heat to transfer energy from one place to another. These demonstration activities act as unique phenomena in which students can generate questions to lead subsequent investigations with each activity in learning centers.  Through... View full description >>

Solar Updraft Towers Lesson 1: Informative Writing--Where Does Energy Come From?

Average Rating:
0
Author:
Lisa Morgan
Intended Grade Level(s):
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
energy sources
renewable energy
Non-Renewable Energy
Estimated Activity Length:
10 hours
Learning Goal(s):
  1. Students will understand ten renewable and non-renewable energy sources on the earth.
  2. Students will learn the locations of different energy sources on the earth.
  3. Students will learn the history of energy sources and how they have been used by humans.
  4. Students will learn about innovations and inventions used to find, recover, store and release energy for human consumption.

This lesson is a non-fiction research and writing project, which includes a differentiated choice menu and list of ideas for publishing the completed project. Each student will choose one of ten energy sources to research, including coal, natural gas, petroleum, propane, uranium, biomass, wind, geothermal, hydropower and solar. He or she will... View full description >>

Solar Updraft Towers Unit Overview

Average Rating:
0
Author:
Lisa Morgan
Intended Grade Level(s):
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
energy sources
renewable energy
Non-Renewable Energy
Estimated Activity Length:
10 hours
Learning Goal(s):
  1. Students will understand ten renewable and non-renewable energy sources on the earth.
  2. Students will learn the locations of different energy sources on the earth.
  3. Students will learn the history of energy sources and how humans have used them.
  4. Students will learn about innovations and inventions used to find, recover, store, and release energy for human consumption.
  5. Students will understand that hot air rises
  6. Students will understand why hot water and hot air rise and cold air and cold water sink.
  7. Students will learn that wind is produced by warm air rising and cold air sinking.
  8. Students will learn that the energy of moving hot air can be converted into other forms of energy.
  9. Students will understand that energy from the sun can be converted into heat.
  10. Students will discuss the effects of the chimney stack phenomenon.
  11. Students will understand that wind energy can be converted into other forms of energy.
  12. Students will determine different methods to increase the effectiveness of a wind turbine blade by harnessing and converting the mechanical energy of the wind.
  13. Students will determine that thermal energy resulting from the sun’s radiation can create an updraft that will power a turbine to spin.                                       
  14. Students will identify characteristics of turbine design that improve the success of their device.
  15. Students will utilize content from previous phenomena they investigated, such as the chimney stack effect and Norwegian candle toys, to determine how to best harness the energy transformed by their device from the sun.
  16. Students will be able to define and explain what a solar updraft tower is.
  17. Students will make connections between their previous engineering challenge and a real world solution to the world’s growing energy demands.

Students will combine research, direct observations, and hands-on investigation to lead them into an engineering design project involving the construction of a solar updraft tower.  During this process, students will make references to specific phenomena they witnessed in the classroom involving convection currents, solar energy, energy... View full description >>

Activities and Assessment of Vocab and Units (Lesson 2)

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0
Unit:
Author:
Brett McFarland
Intended Grade Level(s):
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
physics
electrical energy
Estimated Activity Length:
2 hours
Learning Goal(s):
  1. Students will be able to define voltage, current, power and energy as it relates to electricity.
  2. Students will be able to define electricity and have the units for all the above terms in their Journals.
  3. Students will be able to set up multimeters for voltage and current and will be assessed on this.
Common Core Standard(s) Met:
N.Q .1
N.Q .2

This lesson is intended as a way to check for student understanding regarding the content presented in the previous lesson of this unit. The assessment takes place in two parts: a written assessment of

... View full description >>

Mini Solar Houses Unit

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0
Author:
Beverly Satterwhite
Intended Grade Level(s):
4th
5th
6th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
electricity
solar energy
current
voltage
photovoltaics
seasonality
Circuitry
energy transformations
Energy Storage
mini-houses
design challenge
photovoltaic installation
Estimated Activity Length:
8 hours
Learning Goal(s):

1. Students will understand how to use an Azimuth finder to determine the direction and altitude that solar modules will face.
2. Students will learn how to describe why a solar module is pitched at a particular angle.
3. Students will understand how to measure the voltage and current for an electrical energy source.
4. Students will learn how to build a circuit that will light a light bulb with a switch and without a switch.
5. Students will understand that the electricity flows through a circuit from an energy source to a load.
6. Students will understand the difference between open and closed circuits.
7. Students will understand the similarities and differences between solar cells and batteries as an energy source.
8. Students will understand how electricity flows through a circuit (from energy sources to loads) with more than one source and more than one load.
9. Students will understand how to build series and parallel circuit and the characteristics of each.
10. Students will learn to power both a light and a fan.
11. Students will learn how to find a fault in a circuit.
12. Students will understand that the electricity flows through a circuit from an energy source to a load.
13. Students will understand the difference between open and closed circuits.
14. Students will identify the causes and solutions to various complications that arise in the construction of circuits.
15. Students will use the design process to create a roof to hold an adequate number of solar modules to power an LED and a fan.
16. Students will understand how to make a geometric net (a 2D drawing that when folded creates a 3D shape) for designing a roof.

In Lesson 1, the lesson focuses on understanding how the angle and orientation affect the amount of energy that is generated through use of a solar cell. Paper azimuth finders, Keva Planks, and multimeters will be used in order for students to draw conclusions about the optimal placement of a solar cell. This lesson will prepare students for... View full description >>

Reflecting Sunlight (Lesson 12)

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0
Unit:
Author:
Debbie Abel
Intended Grade Level(s):
4th
5th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
Science
reflection/absorption
electromagnetic radiation
solar energy
Estimated Activity Length:
50 min
Learning Goal(s):

Students will learn that reflectors can be used to increase solar oven temperatures by concentrating solar energy. Students will use their observations from the prior lesson to make claims based on the concepts of reflection and absorption within a solar oven system. Students will use their observations from reflection and absorption experiments to determine how to best capture reflected solar energy.

Students will see a demonstration and conduct a simple experiment on reflecting sunlight.  During this demonstration, they will determine the purpose of the reflectors on a solar oven’s design and make observations about their functionality. They will use what they learn to build their solar ovens. View full description >>

Solar Ovens: Choosing Colors (Lesson 11)

Average Rating:
0
Unit:
Author:
Debbie Abel
Intended Grade Level(s):
4th
5th
Subject Area(s) Covered:
Science
absorption/reflection
electromagnetic radiation
solar energy
Estimated Activity Length:
50 min
Learning Goal(s):

Students will learn that darker colors absorb more sunlight and get warmer. Students will understand the relation of absorption to thermal radiation emission. Students will conduct an experiment that isolates color as a variable to test.

Students will conduct experiments using different colors of paper.  During this process, they will make observations about the functionality of different colors when incorporated into design in relation to reflection and absorption.  Students will use what they learn to build their solar ovens. View full description >>

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